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Full text of "Pickering College Pickering Ontario 1911-1912"

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igii - 1912 



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ESTABLISHED AND MAINTAINED 
BY THE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 



Newmarket ($ntartn 

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CATALOGUE FOR THE YEAR 

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PICKERING COLLEGE 

MAIN ENTRANCE 



$nar& of management: 



Albert S. Rogers, Chairman and Treasurer 
William Harris, Secretary 



William Harris, Rockwood Albert S. Rogers, Toronto 

Esli Terrill, Wooler 



iErprrarntatturB of $rarlu, iltetttig 

Joseph P. Rogers, Toronto Joseph A. Cody, Newmarket 
W. K. Bowerman, Bloomfield Albert Walker, Beaconsfield 
Albert Colouhoun, Gowrie Abram B. Saylor, Bloomfield 



txcrutto (Emitmtttrr 

Albert S. Rogers Elias Rogers William Harris 

Joseph P. Rogers Joseph A. Cody 



iFarultu 



William P. Firth, M.A., D.Sc, Principal 

Mathematics and Science. 



Ella Rogers Firth, B.A. , Lady Principal, 

French and German. 



Howard H. Brinton, M.A. 

Classics 

Arthur G. Dorland, M.A., A. F. Grant Cadenhead, 

English and History. Jr. Science and Mathematics. 

Harriet E. Black, M.A., Ethel J. Sutton, 

French and German. Preparatory. 

Fred K. Sutton, 

Commercial Branches. 



James Galloway, A.R. CO., Cicely J. Cotter, 

Vocal and Instrumental Music Junior Piano. 



Marie M. McKinnon, 

Intermediate Piano. 

E. Norma Wright Mary M. Rush, 

Art. Matron. 




prkertng (Unllpgp 



The first steps toward the establishment of this School were 
taken at the Friends' Half Year Meeting, held near Newmarket, 
in the year 1837. Joseph John Gurney, a brother of Elizabeth 
Fry and a well known minister among Friends in England, was 
present, and largely through his encouragement and aid, it was 
decided to establish a Friends' Boarding School near Picton, 
Prince Edward Country. 

The School was opened in 1842, and in 1848 was incorporated 
under the name : "The Trustees of the Friends' or Quakers' 
Seminary." 

After a continuous corporate existence of thirty years, it was 
removed to a more central location at Pickering, at which place 
it became widely known for its thorough work and home-like 
resident life. As its reputation grew, the buildings and premises 
became quite inadequate to meet the needs of the constantly in- 
creasing number of students, and when, on the eve of re-opening 
for the Winter Term of 1906, the main building was totally 
destroyed by fire, it was felt that in rebuilding provision should 
be made, not only for present needs, but also for future growth 
and development. 



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The advisibility of securing larger grounds, more convenient 
of access, with the advantages of town water supply, electric 
light and fire protection, led the management to decide upon 
abandoning the site at Pickering, notwithstanding its old 
associations, and to select a site in the outskirts of the town of 
Newmarket. 

Through the liberality of the friends of the School in Canada 
and the United States, and the very generous aid received from 
Friends in England, it has been possible to erect in this place a 
building, ample in size and thoroughly suited to the work of a 
well equipped modern school. 

Newmarket is a thriving town, thirty-three miles north of 
Toronto, and easy of access both by the Grand Trunk Railway 
and the Metropolitan Trolley Line. 

The College has an ideal location, overlooking the town and 
a wide extent of country in every direction. The grounds consist 
of twenty-five acres, affording ample space for all ourdoor sports. 

The main building has a frontage of 210 feet. The architec- 
ture may be described as modernized Georgian or Colonial, the 
materials used being red brick with white stone trimmings. The 
entrance is marked by four large Corinthian columns, breaking 
the long line of the facade. 

In designing the building the architect has kept in view the 
three principle factors in a successful school building, viz., sim- 
plicity of control and internal arrangement., the lighting of class- 
rooms and bedrooms; and the expression on the facade of the 
purpose of the building. 

An attractive entrance hall, reception room, office, assembly 
rooms, with classrooms and music rooms occupy the greater part 
of the ground floor; the second and third floors are devoted to 
libraries, bedrooms and bathrooms. 

The classrooms are believed to be models in point of dimen- 
sions, light and ventilation. 

The bedrooms are airy and pleasant, all receiving direct 
sunlight during some part of the day. Each room is arranged to 



accommodate two students, and is provided with a single iron 
bed and a clothes-closet for each student. 

The building- is heated throughout by steam and lighted by 
electricity. It has an abundant supply of pure water, and numerous 
bathrooms and lavatories, with excellent ventilation and drainage. 

A special system of high pressure water mains has been laid 
throughout the building to provide at all times effective fire 
protection. 

The College seeks to give to its students accurate knowledge 
and definite training along those lines best adapted to their 
individual needs. It emphasizes the distinctly academic side of 
school work in preparing students for the examinations of the 
Education Department of Ontario, and for matriculation into the 
universities and scientific schools of the Province; it emphasizes 
the practical side in preparing students for general business and 
commercial careers ; and it emphasizes the aesthetic side in its 
fully developed courses in music and art. While its success in 
these phases of school work has been marked, in no phase has it 
been more successful than in fulfilling its primary purpose — the 
development, by a through training in the essentials of a liberal 
education, and by the healthy influences of a well-ordered home 
life, of cultured and Christian men and women. 

In recognition of this primary purpose the founders of the 
School adopted co-education. They believe — and long experi- 
ence has abundantly proved the justness of their belief— that co- 
education was the proper education, because the natural education. 
Young people possess social as well as intellectual natures, and 
these need development and refinement. What can be more 
helpful than their association under careful and judicious super- 
vision? In Pickering College, as elsewhere, experience has 
shown, moreover, that such association, in giving additional 
gracefulness and modest self-control to the girls' deportment, 
and a manly courtesy and deference to the boys', is an excellent 
stimulus to scholarship. 

The work of the College embraces several departments : 
Preparatory, Collegiate, Commercial, Music and Art. 




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I. Preparatory. — In the Preparatory Department the pupil 
receives a grounding in elementary work, a grounding made 
more thorough by the constant supervision of the teachers during 
study hours, and under the skilful guidance of the Collegiate as 
well as the Preparatory instructors during recitation. The 
course of study embraces the work as laid down by the Minister 
of Education for the Public Schools of Ontario. 

IL Collegiate. — From the Preparatory the pupil passes into 
the Collegiate Department, whose standard of admission is the 
equivalent of the High School Entrance Examination. The cur- 
riculum of the Collegiate Department covers the work for the 
Pass and Honor Matriculation Examinations of Toronto Univer- 
sity, also that prescribed by the Education Department of Ontario 
for the Teachers' Examinations. Students not wishing to take 
such examinations are recommended to pursue the course for the 
College Diploma. This course embraces the work of the first 
four years in English, History and Mathematics, and any three 
of the following : Latin, Greek, French, German, Physics and 
Chemistry. It is provided that students may substitute the 
equivalent in Music, Painting or Drawing for a part of this work. 
Should the student not wish to pursue the course for the College 
Diploma, he may select a special course from the Collegiate and 
Commercial Departments, provided that such a course, in charac- 
ter and extent, meets the approval of the Principal. 

III. Commercial. — The great industrial and commercial move- 
ments of the age emphasize the need of a business education. 
Side by side with the Collegiate Course, and at times including 
some of its subjects, runs the Commercial Course. It offers 
instruction in Single and Double Entry Book-keeping, Commer- 
cial Arithmetic, Commercial Law, Business Forms, Penmanship, 
Shorthand and Typewriting. 

As technical skill alone will not suffice to make a good busi- 
ness man, it is desirable that before entering this department the 
student should possess a good English education. 

A student may follow one of the two courses outlined here- 
after. A certificate will be awarded on the completion cf either 
course. 



PANORAMA OF COLLEGE GROUNDS 



(Cttrrtralum 



Reading : Third Reader. Literature of the Lessons. Memorization. |ft*I?;pm'tlifli'y 
Supplementary Reading. StfttarltttPttt 



Spelling : Oral Spelling- and Dictation. 

Grammar and Composition : Classes of Words and their Inflections. 
Descriptive and Letter Writing-. 

Geography : Elementary Physical Geography. Geography of North and 
South America, Dominion of Canada, and more particularly Ontario. 

History : Biographical Sketches of Famous Persons. Stories of the early 
history of Canada and Great Britain. 

Art : Freehand Expression with Pen, Pencil and Water Color. 

Arithmetic : Reduction. Compound Rules. Bills and Accounts. Aver- 
ages. Sharing and Measurements. Mental Arithmetic. 

Physiology and Hygiene : Conversations. 

Nature Study : Simpler forms of Plant and Animal Life. 



FIRST 
YEAR 



9 




RECEPTION HALL, OPENING INTO ASSEMBLY ROOM 



RECEPTION HALL, SHOWING OFFICE AND BOYS CORRIPOR 



Preparatory 
Irparimrttt 

Second 
Year 



Reading: Fourth Reader (first half ). Supplementary Reading. 

Literature : Study of suitable Selections of Prose and Poetry. Memoriza- 
tion. 

Spelling : Oral and from Dictation. 

Grammar and Composition : Elements of English Grammar. Analysis and 
Parsing. Descriptive and Narrative Composition. Letter Writing. 

Geography : Physical Geography. Geography of Continents. Map 
Drawing. 



Hist 01 



Outlines of British and Canadian Historv. Local Historv. 



Arithmetic : Measures, Multiples and Fractions. Mental Arithmetic. 
Art : Study of Color continued. Drawing of Common Objects. 
Physiology : Digestion, Respiration and Circulation. 
Nature Study: Work of First Year continued. 



10 




ASSEMBLY ROOM, FROM THE REAR 



ASSEMBLY ROOM, FROM THE PLATFORM 



Reading ; Fourth Reader (second half). Supplementary Reading. 

Spelling : Systematic Orthography and Orthoepy. 

Literature : Study of Selected Passages and of books suited to the capacity 
of the pupils. Memorization. 

Grammar and Composition : Course of previous year continued and de- 
veloped. 

Geography : Geography of Canada, British Empire and the United States. 
Map Drawing. 

History : British and Canadian History, with special attention to Cana- 
dian History since 1841. 

Arithmetic : Percentages, Interest, etc. Mental Arithmetic. 

Physiology : The Nervous System. Hygiene and Temperance. 

Art: Freehand Perspective and Simple Geometric Drawing. Drawing of 
Plants, insects, etc. Simple Landscapes. 

Latin : Declensions and Conjugations. 

French : Easy Grammar and Conversation. 

Nature Study : Work of Second Year continued. Soils, Rocks, Natural 
Phenomena. 

NOTE.— Penmanship and Biblical History are taught in all the years. The text-books 
used in this department are those authorized by the Minister of Education for the Public 
Schools of Ontario. 



{trrpantturi; 
Srparinmtt 



THIRD 
YEAR 



11 




Girls' Corridor 



Dining Room 



(EoilpflUtt^ Reading : Intelligent and Intelligible Natural Reading. 

Ifcpartm?nt 

Grammar : Principles of Etymology and Syntax. Analysis of Words and 
first and Sentences. Outlines of the History of the Language. 

SECOND 

forms Rhetoric and Composition : Oral and Written Composition, chiefly Narra- 

tive and Descriptive, Letter Writing. Sentence and Paragraph 
Structure. 



Literature : Study of Selected Works, both Prose and Poetry. Memoriza- 
tion of choice passages. 



History : History of Canada. Outline of British History. 

Geography : Physical and Commercial Geography. Geography of the 
British Empire. 

Arithmetic : High School Arithmetic, through Stocks and Exchange. 
Mensuration of plane rectilinear figures and solids. 

Algebra : Elementary Work, Factoring, etc., through Simultaneous Equa- 
tions. 



12 




CHEMICAL LABORATORY 



LIBRARY AND REAPING ROOMS 



Geometry : Definitions, use of Instruments. The Course in Geometry VJ-iUlVylcU* 

begun. Separimmt 



Latin : Elementary Latin Book, with introductory work in Prose Authors. 
Greek : White's Greek Grammar. Easy Translation. 



FIRST AND 

SECOND 

FORMS 



French : High School French Grammar. Conversation. Easy Translation. 



German: High School German Grammar. Conversation. Easy Translati 



Science : An Elementary Course in Botany, Zoology, Physics, and 
Chemistry. 



Art : Drawing from Models. Freehand. Perspective. Inventive Illus- 
trative Drawing. Ornamental Design. 

Book-keeping and Penmanship : Single and Double Entry. Business Forms. 



13 




ART ROOM 



WOOD CARVING AND CLAY MODELLING CLASS 



(EnllfflUltP Composition : Narration, Description and Exposition. Letter Writing - . 
JJotftrtmimt Class Writing. Class Debates. Study of Prose Models. 

third and Literature : Selections from Coleridge and Wordsworth, Shakespeare's 

FOURTH Merchant of Venice. 

FORMS 

History and Geography : Roman History to the Death of Augustus. 
Greek History to the Fall of Corinth. British History from 1763 
to 1885. 

Algebra '• Through Quadratics. 
Geometry : Ontario H. S. Geometry. 

Latin : Latin Grammar and Composition. Casar: Book IV., chaps. 20-38; 
Book V., 1-23; Virgil: Book II, 1-505. 

Greek: Selections from Xenophon, Homer; Iliad VI. 66-118; 237 to 
end. Grammar and Composition. 



14 




A BOY S ROOM 



A GIRL S ROOiM 



French : Grammar and Prose Composition. Conversation. Selections OlilllprtiTtP 
from Dumas, Perrault, Moliere, Victor Hugo and others. Labiche, 39 ,%*«♦♦ + + 

Les Petits Oiseaux. 

THIRD AND 

German : Grammar and Prose Composition. Conversation. High School fourth 

German Reader. Baumbach. Waldnovellen. forms 

Chemistry : Experimental Course. Chemistry of the Commoner Elements 
and their most characteristic compounds. Chemical Theory. 

Physics : Heat, Electricity, Sound, Light. 



English Composition and Rhetoric : Essay Writing. Critical Study of (ILOllfl^ttA^ 
Prose Models. Class Debates. SpJtartlHPttt 



Literature : Selections from Wordsworth and Coleridge, Shakespeare's 
Merchant of Venice, and Henry IV. Part I. Study of Prose Authors 
not prescribed. 



FIFTH AND 

SIXTH 

FORMS 



15 




BOYS TENNIS COURTS 



(Hullf lltcttf History : General Outline of Mediaeval and Modern European History 



FIFTH AND 

SIXTH 

FORMS 

Continued 



Algebra : Work in Form III. continued, with Progressions, Binomial The- 
orem, Annuities, etc. 

Geometry : Course in Form III. continued. Co-ordinate Geometry of the 
point, straight line and circle. 



Trigonometry : Plane Trigonometry. 

Latin : Prose Composition. Caesar : Bellum Gallicum, Books I., II. Virgil : 
^Eneid Book II. vv., 1-505. Cicero: Pro Lege Manilia. 

Greek : Prose Composition. Homer, Iliad, I., 1-350; III., 121-344; VI., 
66-118 and 237 to end; Odyssey, VI. and IX. Xenophon ; 
Hellenica (Philpott's Selections, Sections I. and II.) 



French : Grammar and Prose Composition. Texts for Fourth Form: 
Labiche; Les Petits Oiseux ; Merimee ; Colomba. 




NEAR THE SWIMMING POOL 



German. : Grammar and Prose Composition. Texts for Fourth Form :- - (JJnllpfltatf 
Baumbach : Waldnovellen. -a 

Zschokke, Der Tote Cast. IrpartttUtlt 



Chemistry : The practical study of the principal elements, with their most 
characteristic compounds in illustration of Mendelejeffs Classification 
of the Elements. Qualitative Analysis. 



FIFTH AND 

SIXTH 

FORMS 

Continued 



Physics, Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology: As outlined for Entrance to Faculty 
of Education and Honour Matriculation 



NOTE — (a) Biblical History is taught in all the Forms, (b) Each Form is required to 
do a certain amount of supplementary reading in connection with the work in English. The 
list of authors and books is not absolutely fixed, but varies from year to year. The aim is 
to cultivate a taste for good literature raiher than to insist upon the use of special books. 
It is intended, however, that before leaving the Fourth Form each pupil shall have read 
some of the masterpieces of English Literature, (c) The text-books used in the Collegiate 
Department are those authorized by the Minister of Education for use in the High Schools 
and Collegiate Institutes of Ontario. 



17 




COLLEGE RUGBY TEAM (NOVEMBER 1910) 



(£mttm?rrial Uepartmpnt 



(EnUtUlf rrtill Book-keeping-, theoretical and practical. 
*0£llcU*ilttPtti Business Forms and Business Correspondence. 
Banking - . 

Commercial Arithmetic. 
Spelling and Punctuation. 
Practical Grammar. 
Penmanship. 
Commercial Law. 



BUSINESS 
COURSE 



SHORTHAND 

AND 

TYPEWRITING 

COURSE 



Shorthand (Isaac Pitman's System). 

Typewriting (Touch Method). 

Business Forms and Business Correspondence. 

Spelling and Punctuation. 

Practical Grammar. 

Office Practice. 

Elementary Book-keeping (Optional). 



IS 




COLLEGE HOCKEY TEAM 



Mmic Department 



This department is under the directorship of Mr. James 
Galloway, Associate of the Royal College of Organists (London, 
England); a member of the Faculty of the Toronto Conservatory 
of Music ; Organist and Choirmaster of the Church of St. Mary 
Magdalene, Toronto 

In the course of his musical education Mr. Galloway was for 
five years an articled pupil to Dr. H. A. Harding, F.R.C O., 
L.R.A.M. — one of England's finest musicians and teachers — with 
whom he studied the Piano, Organ, Harmony and Counterpoint, 
Choir-training and Voice Production. 

Lectures will be delivered on various musical subjects, and 
Recitals given from time to time for the benefit of students. 



Btfmvtmmt 



Students are prepared for the various examinations of the 
Toronto Conservatory of Music, special attention being given to 
detail, style and general musicianship. 




GIRLS HOCKEY TEAM 



CALISTHENICS CLASS 



Jffluatr 
Hepctrtmpttt 



PIANO 
COURSE 



The College Course is designed to extend over a period of 
three years, and is particularly adapted to those who wish to pre- 
pare for the musical profession and to amateurs who desire 
thorough and systematic training. 

Candidates for the examination of each year must be prepared 
to play eight pieces selected from the syllabus. Not less than six 
composers shall be represented by any pupil presenting himself as 
a candidate for examination. The examiner will attach more 
weight to the interpretation of compositions and to style of playing 
than to the technical difficulty of the compositions chosen. 

A preparatory Course intended to lead up to the Collegiate is 
open to all students, whether they have previously acquired ac- 
knowledge of music or not. 

A diploma will be granted upon the satisfactory completion of 
the Collegiate Course. 



vocal In voice training special attention is given to the prevention or 

course correction of vocal defects, to the all-important feature — the Art 

of Breathing — to the production of a clear and perfect tone, 

enunciation and declamation, and to the careful avoidance of the 

least forcing of the voice. 

Candidates for the examination of each year must be prepared 
to sing six compositions selected from the syllabus. 

A diploma will be granted upon the satisfactory completion of 
the course. 

20 




CROSSING THE BROOK, 



SATURDAY OUTING (MAY 1911) 



AROUND THE LUNCH TABLE 



Art irpartmpttt 



Directress : Miss F. H. McGillivray 



The head of this department, Miss F. H. McGillivray, is a 
teacher of long- and varied experience who has been connected 
with the College since 1892. The regular teaching is done by 
the resident teacher, Miss Norma E. Wright. In addition to the 
course in drawing in the Preparatory and Colleg-iate Depart- 
ments, in which the students are prepared for diplomas and 
teachers' certificates of the Education Department of Ontario, 
careful attention is given to more advanced work in drawing, 
painting, wood-carving, etc. 

The course includes : Freehand Drawing, Drawing- from 
Antique, Drawing from Life, Painting in Oil, Painting in Water 
Color, Out of Door Sketching-, Decorative Design, China 
Painting, Wood Carving and Modelling- in Clay. 

The Art Room is large and well lig-hted, and is furnished 
with casts, models, and all appliances necessary for thorough 
work. 



Art 
Sfpartttwnt 



21 




REAR OF BUILDING FROM ATHLETIC FIELD 



PRINCIPALS RESIDENCE AND COLLEGE FROM THE NORTHWEST 



Fall 
Term 

iFppfi fnr Collegiate and Commer- ] Boys - - - $92.00 

Kmtotlt CIAL Departments J Girls - - - 88.00 

UlTtttlli 1 Boys - - - 88.00 
* + Preparatory Department 

| Girls - - - 84.00 

lExtrtlfi Piano- Mr. Galloway - - 18.75 

" — McKinnon, or \ nnn 

Miss Cotter J " " 1 - UU 

Vocal— Mr. Galloway - 18.75 

Choral Class 2.25 

Use of Piano (1 hour daily) ------ 3.00 

Painting- - 12.00 

Drawing- and Clay Modelling 7.50 

Wood Carving 9.00 

Use of Typewriter - 3.00 

Shorthand and Typewriting \ fi ~~ 
Collegiate and Preparatory Pupils J 



Winter 
Term 


Spring 
Term 


$74.75 


$63.25 


71.50 


60.50 


71.50 


60.50 


68.25 


57.75 


1G.25 


13.75 


10.40 


8.80 


16.25 


13.75 


2.00 


1.60 


2.60 


2.20 


10.40 


8.80 


6.50 


5.50 


7.80 


6.60 


2.60 


2.20 



5.20 



4.30 



22 




VIEW OF NEWMARKET 



ON FAIRY LAKE 



The Fees for the resident pupils include washing- (number of |£xm>ttl3£B 
pieces limited), care of rooms, fuel, light, as well as board and 
tuition, but do not include the extras mentioned above. 

ALL FEES ARE PAYABLE IN ADVANCE AT THE 
OPENING OF THE TERM. Checks, drafts, etc., should be 
made payable to Albert S. Rogers, Treasurer. When two or more 
students come from the same family, a reduction of five per cent, 
is made. A similar reduction is made to the children of ministers. 

No allowances are made for short absences, or for absences 
during the first or last two weeks of the term, Students are 
admitted at any time, and, with these exceptions, are charged 
pro rata from the date of admission. 

In cases of protracted illness, students will be allowed to fur- 
nish satisfactory substitutes for the remainder of the term, or to 
make up the time of their absence themselves the next term. If 
students be suspended or expelled they will forfeit their fees for 
that term. 

Books, stationery, etc., may be procured at the College at 
current rates. 

Parents wishing students to be supplied with books, stationery 
or pocket money, should make a deposit with the principal for Jffltp 
that purpose. 



23 



VIEW WEST AND NORTHWEST FROM THE COLLEGE 



Satly Routine 



7 a.m. Rising Bell. 

7.30. Breakfast. 

8.15-8.45. Morning- study. 

9-10.45. Morning school. 

10.45-11. Recess. 

11-12. Morning school. 

12.15. Dinner. 



1.15-2.25. Afternoon school. 
2.25-2.35. Recess. 
2.35-3.45. Afternoon school. 
5.45. Tea. 
6.45. Prayers. 
7-9. Evening study. 
9.30. Retiring bell. 



Note. — (a) Junior pupils are excused from the last hour of evening study. 

(b) Saturday is a holiday, but preparation for Monday's classes is 

done on Saturday morning instead of Friday evening. 

(c) In order that all students may be kept in touch with current 

news, the principal gives a brief resume^ of the current events 
of the day at the beginning of evening study. 



24 



©rgantzattnna anfo IfogutattonB 

The Literary Society is sustained by teachers and students, 
and has proved to be one of the most useful features of the College. 
The President is always an officer of the school ; all pupils are its 
members. Its Laws and Rules of Order have been framed with 
the greatest care, and with the intent that all belonging to the 
society shall gain such experience in methods of transacting 
business in public meetings as will be most useful to them in the 
actual affairs of life. At each meeting debates are held, or essays 
read, and readings and recitations given. These tend to train 
the students in facility and exactness of expression in public 
assemblies, and to develop a taste for useful and elevating litera- 
ture by the study and thoughtful preparation required. 

"The College Journal," the Society's manuscript paper, is 
read by the editors before the Society at regular meetings. 

The College Reading Room is managed by the Society, and 
affords to members ample facilities for becoming acquainted 
not only with current news, but also with some of the choice 
periodical literature of the time. 

The discipline of the College is kind, but it is firmly and 
impartially administered. Good discipline is based upon reason 
and upon a sense of justice and consideration for others, and the 
good discipline of Pickering College is derived from appeals to 
these qualities, from the unity of interests, and from the sym- 
pathy and kindliness between teacher and pupil that should mark 
resident life. 

All rules and regulations of the College are the products of 
long experience, and with these rules the staff expects — and 
exacts — an unquestioning compliance. Severe or even frequent 
punishments of any kind will not be resorted to. When a stu- 
dent's influence is felt to be harmful, he may be asked to leave at 
any time without specific charges being made against him. Gross 




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Swim 



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atib 

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AbsmttB 



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SUjmrt ani 
iExatttuta- 

ttOttfi 

Ityijsiral 
(Eulturr 



Srrrrations 



misconduct or continued violation of the rules of the school will 
be met by suspension, and after investigation by the Committee 
of Management, this suspension may become expulsion. 

As absence from the regular school duties, even for a single 
day, interferes seriously with the work of the pupil, no one will 
be allowed to go home during the term — special or urgent cases 
excepted — or stay overnight with friends in the vicinity, except 
by written request from the parent or guardian to the Principal. 
It is earnestly desired that such requests be made as rarely as 
possible. 

Punctual attendance from the first to the closing day of each 
term is of vital importance, not only to the student himself, but 
to the members of the classes with which he is connected. Parents 
are therefore strongly urged to see that their children return 
punctually after the holidays. 

During the hours for preparation students are expected to 
study in the school-room under the supervision of teachers. The 
habit thus formed of quiet, systematic study, and the assistance 
given, in case of need, by the teacher in charge, have in the past 
proved important factors in maintaining a high standard of 
excellence in work throughout the School. 

Reports of conduct and progress in study are sent to parents 
and guardians monthly. These reports are made up partly from 
daily records and partly from written tests. Reports of term 
examinations are sent out at Christmas, Easter and Midsummer. 

All students are required to attend the classes in Physical 
Culture, for which no extra charge is made. The course will 
consist of Calisthenic Exercises, Freehand Gymnastics, Exercises 
with Dumb-bells, Clubs, etc. 

For the preservation of health, and for the physical develop- 
ment of the students, outdoor exercise is encouraged, and cordial 
support is given to athletic sports ; but these sports are regarded 
as a means to an end and are not allowed to take a first place in 
the school life. 



26 



The College grounds comprise twenty-five acres, thus afford, 
ing space for large separate playing fields for junior and senior 
boys, as well as ample recreation grounds for the girls. 

An Athletic Association has been established by the students, 
and the games — cricket, basket-ball, football, baseball, hockey, 
tennis, etc., are under its control. 

Every afternoon, weather permitting, the girls, accompanied 
by one of the lady teachers, walk out together for exercise. In 
suitable weather, tennis, croquet, basketball or skating may take 
the place of the afternoon walk. 

The Annual Games are held in June, when, through the kind- 
ness of the friends of the College, useful and valuable prizes are 
offered for competition. 

The College skating rink is a large building, 150 feet long 
by 55 feet broad. It is lighted by electricity and provided with 
dressing rooms and spectator's gallery. It not only provides for 
the skating in winter, but serves as a covered playground during 
the inclement weather in spring and fall. 

Intimately connected with the question of the recreation of 
the students is that of the health of the students. The location 
of the school buildings is unusually favorable — high, dry, well 
drained, removed from all other buildings, from swampy or 
malarial districts, and from all predisposing causes of disease. 
The buildings themselves are large, airy and well ventilated, with 
an excellent hot and cold water supply, baths, lavatories, etc. 
The plumbing is the best scientifically that can be procured, and 
the system of drainage is as perfect as modern sanitation can 
make it. The school life is regular. Special attention is given 
to the time and quality of the meals, the hours of study and 
recreation, etc. 

Parents are assured that prompt and efficient attention will 
be given to all cases of illness, and, when necessary, isolation 
will be provided. In serious cases immediate notification will be 
sent to the parents. 




%alll? 



•27 




attfc Movni 
Jlttfitrurtton 



The Principal is a Minister of the Society of Friends, and all 
religious meetings are under his supervision. 

On the Sabbath those students who are not Friends, and 
whose parents desire it, are allowed to attend their own places of 
worship (if the services are held in the daytime) at such hours as 
will not conflict with the College Bible School ; all others are 
expected to attend the Friends' Meeting. In Newmarket there 
are, besides the Friends', the following places of worship : Pres- 
byterian, Methodist, Christian, Church of England and Roman 
Catholic. 

In addition to the week-day classes in Bible History, Bible 
Classes are held on Sabbath afternoons, and a meeting for wor- 
ship in the College in the evening. 

Prayer Meetings are held once a week under the auspices of 
the College Y.P. S.C.E. These meetings have, in the past, been 
a source of great blessing to both teachers and studens. 

Note. — All students are expected to attend the Bible School 
and the Sabbath Evening Meeting, unless excused for good and 
sufficient reasons by the Principal. 



AppltntttOHB Applications for admission should be accompanied by satis- 

factory evidence of good moral character, also by such informa- 
tion as may prove useful in making arrangements for the welfare 
of the pupil. A blank form of application will be found enclos- 
ed with this announcement, which should be filled out, and for- 
warded to the Principal. 

No student will be received who has been dismissed from any 
other school an account of bad conduct, or who is addicted to 
the use of tobacco or alcoholic liquors. 



28 



Damage to property must be promptly reported and paid for. 

The occupants of each room will be held responsible for all 
damages in the room. 

All necessary articles of furniture are provided by the School, 
but students are encouraged to bring pictures, cushions, etc., 
with which to beautify their rooms. 

Students are expected to provide their own towels, toilet 
soap, napkins and napkin ring. They should also be provided 
with laundry bag, rubbers or overshoes and umbrellas. 

All articles of clothing should be plainly marked in indelible 
ink with the name of the owner. Neglect of this precaution causes 
losses for which the School will not be responsible. 

Books, newspapers, etc., brought into the College by the 
pupils, or received by them, are subject to the approval of the 
Principal. 

Drinking wine, beer, or spirituous liquours, the use of tobacco 
in any manner and in any place, profane or indecent language, 
card playing and the use of firearms are strictly forbidden. No 
student who persists in any of these practices will be allowed to 
remain in the College. 

No student will be allowed to go swimming, bathing, boating 
or fishing without permission and supervision. 




(fettrral 
3Infnrmattmt 



29 



(ttalenlmr 



1911 






Monday, Sept. 11, Fall Term opens. 

Tuesday, Sept. 12, Classes begin. 

Thursday, Dec. 14, Christmas Examinations begin. 

Thursday, Dec. 21, Christmas Vacation begins. 



19 12 

Tuesday, Jan. 9, Winter Term begins. 

Friday, Mar. 29, Easter Examinations begin. 

Thursday, April 4, Winter Term closes. 

Wednesday, April 10, Spring Term begins. 

Friday, June 14, Final Examinations begin. 

Saturday, June 15, Field Day. 

Thursday, June 20, Closing Exercises. 

Friday, June 21, Summer Vacation begins. 



30